The Association would like to advise the following:

1.  WA Entry conditions for washed ware potatoes

This is very good news for industry and I would like to thank Biosecurity SA for persistent science-based dialogue with the Government of WA to enable this change.

Below is the extract of the updated WA entry condition for washed ware potatoes. PIRSA Biosecurity SA has been advised that this is all that now needs to be met. (The need to certify resistant varieties and sandy soils etc has been removed).                             

Please see the link to the site.

Enter ‘potato’ and select ‘Below ground’ and ‘SA’ to open the condition

 

quarantine

 

2.  Removal of interstate trade restrictions (WA) relating to TPP/CLso

On 21 December 2018, Condition 17 was modified to reflect South Australia’s acceptance of CLso Freedom in Western Australia as the result of ongoing surveillance and testing of crops verifying that the organism is not present in WA. SA was the last jurisdiction to agree to the modifications. Also see Plant Biosecurity notice (below).

 

biosec 2

Due diligence was being formerly undertaken by Potatoes South Australia and the above decision was disappointing.  However, as the largest production states in Australia, the South Australian and Victorian industries are working together with their state regulators (Plant & Food Standards/ Plant Health Managers; Biosecurity SA and AgVic) and respective Ministers to address the consequences of the opening of the Western Australian border to the other mainland states. 

There is potential opportunity to refine the current protocols to enable higher risk mitigation; particularly regarding surveillance, other exotic pests and diseases and the practicality/implementation of action plans on-farm and at borders should CLso be detected in any Australian state. 

It is critical that we maintain our stringent biosecurity standards as Australia has a unique advantage in a growing number of international export markets into which we now have access, particularly in the seed sector. We currently have comparatively low disease pressure and this must be sustained.